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Shave OEM Air Intake like a CAI Tube?

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Old 07-06-2013, 11:25 PM
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Default Shave OEM Air Intake like a CAI Tube?

I will probably end up getting some tubing, but looking at the OEM Intake I was curious if I could just shave it down to just the tube itself...main question tho is what is the purpose of the port on the inside (see pic #2)???



Purpose of this port?

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Old 07-06-2013, 11:41 PM
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That porthole is strictly a resonator. It creates a whistle effect that cancels out the audible frequency of the air that's rushing in the air box and airhat. You can shave that and cap up that porthole as long as you can make it airtight. It would essentially be the same as the k&n tube only kit. There are actually 2 portholes, or resonators, in that air hat. The other is closer to the throttle body.
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Old 07-07-2013, 12:12 AM
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That porthole is strictly a resonator. It creates a whistle effect that cancels out the audible frequency of the air that's rushing in the air box and airhat. You can shave that and cap up that porthole as long as you can make it airtight. It would essentially be the same as the k&n tube only kit. There are actually 2 portholes, or resonators, in that air hat. The other is closer to the throttle body.
Gotcha! Thanks for the input...gonna price out a couple "Tube Only" kits and if they are cheap enough I might go that route...don't wanna waste the time messing with this one if I don't have to...PLUS...

Looking for ideas on what to do with my Intake Manifold itself to clean it up, dress it up, painting ideas, etc...so feel free to give some input if you have anything worth trying!
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Old 07-08-2013, 03:58 PM
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I used a 3 inch street elbow and replaced it. Works like a champ.
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Old 07-09-2013, 03:55 AM
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I used a 3 inch street elbow and replaced it. Works like a champ.
Thanks Burger...I figured I would do a little fab work on my own anyway...I guess I'll shop for some inexpensive Chrome Tubing...3" 's you say? I'll see what I can find. I've seen a ton of cheap universal kits on eBay for like $30...I have my doubts. Also seen Universal kits from both Spectre and Air Raid for about $100...the debate continues...plus as far as cone filters...what to choose...AFE dry filter or K&N oiled...
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Old 07-09-2013, 08:57 AM
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i think it was 3" it was a while ago. i clamped it to the throttle body with a nice rubber hose connector.
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Old 07-10-2013, 05:57 AM
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Yeah, I was at Home Depot yesterday and found myself in the plumbing aisle and almost grabbed a bunch of tubing...but I figured I should probably get some kind of measurements at least lol
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Old 07-10-2013, 06:32 AM
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Yeah, I was at Home Depot yesterday and found myself in the plumbing aisle and almost grabbed a bunch of tubing...but I figured I should probably get some kind of measurements at least lol
A 3" tube & associated elbows would work - much better than the "accordion" style OEM tube. The effective diameter of the OEM tube I would guess to be 2" or less because of all the vortexes generated around that accordion flex. I've used ABS plumbing for this. The disadvantage is the thickness of the tube makes it difficult to bend smoothly, so I was forced into using the elbows and connectors as well. You can get the rubber adapters that go from 3" to whatever you need at the other end - I used a 3 to 2.5 for my jeep (I've posted a few pics on this & the jeep forums if you'd like to have a look.
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:26 PM
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A 3" tube & associated elbows would work - much better than the "accordion" style OEM tube. The effective diameter of the OEM tube I would guess to be 2" or less because of all the vortexes generated around that accordion flex. I've used ABS plumbing for this. The disadvantage is the thickness of the tube makes it difficult to bend smoothly, so I was forced into using the elbows and connectors as well. You can get the rubber adapters that go from 3" to whatever you need at the other end - I used a 3 to 2.5 for my jeep (I've posted a few pics on this & the jeep forums if you'd like to have a look.


Thanks bro! I'm headed out shopping in a few minutes. Wanna pick up some tubes and go ahead and make this thing. I got an AFE filter in the resonator box now. Might go with a cone later on, but for now I'm gonna mess around with the stock box and some tubing to see if I can redneck together something better than stock.

ABS Plumbing tubing you say? I'll try to look for it. Of course as always I have a query... Obviously the point of a CAI is to get air that is cool as possible to go into the engine. I hear a lot that plastic may not look as pretty as chrome, but it definitely resists heat a bit better (other than price, it's part of the reason I wanna go that way). On top of that, if you really wanna get cooler air to the engine, you should run tubing of some sort out of the box to the front of the vehicle. But I'm wondering...would it be worth it to not only use plastic tubing, but wrap it in some kind of thermal barrier, fiberglass over top, and then sand and paint for a smooth finish, in order to help keep the air as cool as possible?
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:34 PM
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You think this is legit?

Even though the ad lists it in 12"x12" sheets, I contacted him and he said he could do a single sheet big enough to cover the whole under side of the hood. Also, mentioned that he has 3 diff thicknesses (6mm = $35 , 10mm = $44 , & 13mm = $53 ...shipping $5.13 )

With an adhesive backing, you think it could work nicely to wrap a CAI tube and then wrap in a single layer of Fiberglass (just to have a rigid surface to paint)?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/171046652163...S:1123&vxp=mtr
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Old 07-10-2013, 12:38 PM
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Old 07-10-2013, 02:21 PM
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Originally Posted by italiandominator View Post
Thanks bro! I'm headed out shopping in a few minutes. Wanna pick up some tubes and go ahead and make this thing. I got an AFE filter in the resonator box now. Might go with a cone later on, but for now I'm gonna mess around with the stock box and some tubing to see if I can redneck together something better than stock.

ABS Plumbing tubing you say? I'll try to look for it. Of course as always I have a query... Obviously the point of a CAI is to get air that is cool as possible to go into the engine. I hear a lot that plastic may not look as pretty as chrome, but it definitely resists heat a bit better (other than price, it's part of the reason I wanna go that way). On top of that, if you really wanna get cooler air to the engine, you should run tubing of some sort out of the box to the front of the vehicle. But I'm wondering...would it be worth it to not only use plastic tubing, but wrap it in some kind of thermal barrier, fiberglass over top, and then sand and paint for a smooth finish, in order to help keep the air as cool as possible?
The ABS plumbing that I use(d) is the 3" drain pipe and it's associated fittings. If you were to look up the thermal coefficient for this, you'd find that it's really a good insulator as well as being easy to work with (cut & weld), so I wouldn't bother with any wraps. Consider how much air moves through that pipe and how long it's in contact with that pipe and you should be able to get a gut feel for how much heat that ambient air is going to absorb (In many cases in the summer, the ambient air is going to be hotter than the pipe it's going through). I would recommend a heat shield for the filter - this works to both deflect engine heat as well as duct the ambient from the front right into the filter.

To do this with any tubing, you'll need the outside diameter of your throttle body & the inside diameter of your filter end - this is to buy/build an interface to the tubing. You'll also need to determine the routing so that you can figure out how to support the tube and whether you need any special plumbing for hoses, sensors, etc.
Here are some pictures to give you an idea of what I did on my jeep - this was the only CAI project that I took pictures of.

This shows the adapter I used to mount the filter - I used an ABS shower drain for the main part & used a 3" male/male ABS coupling stuck into the drain end & sticking out about 1.5" as the filter mount. Then I had room around the drain flange to mount the heat shield.





This one shows the rubber adapter from the tube to the throttle body:

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Old 07-10-2013, 02:25 PM
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Quote:
Originally Posted by italiandominator View Post
You think this is legit?

Even though the ad lists it in 12"x12" sheets, I contacted him and he said he could do a single sheet big enough to cover the whole under side of the hood. Also, mentioned that he has 3 diff thicknesses (6mm = $35 , 10mm = $44 , & 13mm = $53 ...shipping $5.13 )

With an adhesive backing, you think it could work nicely to wrap a CAI tube and then wrap in a single layer of Fiberglass (just to have a rigid surface to paint)?

http://www.ebay.com/itm/171046652163...S:1123&vxp=mtr
Sound deadening insulation is a good idea, especially if you spend a lot of time in your truck. It's one thing to have the sound of power to everyone you pass, but to sit for hours listening to that drone & roar can have a serious effect on you. Keep in mind that foam will hold moisture and can eventually rot holes in your hood - you don't see this type of stuff from any OEM that I'm familiar with, so even though it looks good, I'd personally stay away from it
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Old 07-10-2013, 07:30 PM
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Thanks, been doing a bit more research and looking at several other options for a new hood liner...don't need one right this minute, so I got time to get the best price on exactly what I am looking for. I totally understand the whole "reflective" heat sheilds and all, but I plan to paint on the underside of my hood, so I don't know what I'll go with. I saw a few DIY videos on YouTube where people made their own with fiberglass sheets and tin foil...*shrug.
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:01 PM
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That's an awesome set up you have there! I'm gonna head on over to my Home Depot and see what I can find...I totally like the PVC or ABS pipe plans...but me being me, I want to see what they have so I could keep everything smooth from end to end, with out having to get male-female flanges etc. Maybe a way to bond two ends flush to one another (i.e. like between a 90 and straight piece)
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:58 PM
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Originally Posted by italiandominator View Post
That's an awesome set up you have there! I'm gonna head on over to my Home Depot and see what I can find...I totally like the PVC or ABS pipe plans...but me being me, I want to see what they have so I could keep everything smooth from end to end, with out having to get male-female flanges etc. Maybe a way to bond two ends flush to one another (i.e. like between a 90 and straight piece)
Your routing will determine how much bending or elbows you'll need. If you want to bend the tubes, you won't be able to use the drain pipe as I did, it's just too thick to bend properly. You'll need to use PVC drain pipe or buy specialty ABS from a plastics supplier & even then, you'll most likely need to make yourself a heatbox to warm the plastic up to being flexible and then bend it carefully - this will take practice not to kink the bend, I don't do it that often and always ruin a few tubes before I get back into the swing of things. The advantage of using the ABS drain pipe over the heatbox method is that the drain pipe is very quick to assemble & you really need to work at ruining it.

If you plan to "weld" a flange to the tube, remember that both PVC and ABS need to be brought together tightly to get a good melt of both pieces thereby making a strong bond. With flat or butt welding, you need to clamp the pieces together (you can also use self tapping screws to pull the pieces together tightly), but with adding a flange to a tube, you need to taper the outside of the tube and the inside of the flange so that the 2 pieces will come together tightly when you push the tube into the flange. I always do the fit dry first, then, I add the solvent to both surfaces and bring them together quickly and as tight as possible. You'll bet a good bond this way.

With PVC, try a few samples of solvents until you get one that reacts with the particular tube the way you want it to - I've found through trial & error that you can't rely on generic PVC solvent working on all PVC - in my experience, it doesn't (again, another reason I usually choose ABS).

If you look up "how to bend ABS tubing", you'll find quite a few articles and some videos that will show you what you need to make an ABS heatbox. This box allows you to heat up a section of ABS tube (about a foot to 18 inches is a good start for trial) to the point of flexibility (you need to experiment on how much heat you run through this box and how long you keep it closed to get that particular tube to flex cleanly). To make a gentle clean bend, you need to get the feel of how much effort you apply to pull the flexible tube apart as you slowly bend it. Once you stop, you're done. If you blow it, start over.
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Old 07-10-2013, 08:58 PM
 
 
 
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