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Switching over from 5w30 to 10w30

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:00 PM
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Default Switching over from 5w30 to 10w30

Question? Had a recommendation the other day to switch my Caravan 3.3L 2004 (115,000KM) from synthetic Pennzoil Platinum 5w30 to 10w30 since it was a higher mileage vehicle? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

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Old 03-29-2012, 05:54 PM
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Originally Posted by jkimchi View Post
Question? Had a recommendation the other day to switch my Caravan 3.3L 2004 (115,000KM) from synthetic Pennzoil Platinum 5w30 to 10w30 since it was a higher mileage vehicle? Any thoughts would be greatly appreciated!

Cheers.
Firstly, 10W-30 should work just fine. My vehicles will be running 10W-30 ths summer per usual and likely next winter as well.

Secondly, check out Pennzoil synthetic and you will likely find it is made from Group lll Base Stock, ie not synthetic at all but a petroleum product. There are very few "synthetic" synthetics out there and the oil companies love to confuse the Customer - it's scandelous.
The German Castrol 0W-30 is the only true synthetic oil in Castrol's line up for example. I don't believe Pennzoil has any unless it's an European formula. Amsoil is an actual synthetic but expensive.

Conventional oil does the job very well and at least one knows what they are getting for the price.

There is a tendency to go to a little thicker oil as the miles build up and energy efficiency isn't being harped on. I would use the 10W-30 without hesitation. That's a pretty regular diet for my vehicles except during cold winter months. 5W is really only 5W when cold.
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Old 04-02-2012, 02:28 PM
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I have never gone from 5w to 10w oil just because the engine had 100,000 miles on it, in fact I have never bought into the BS that you need to use the high mileage oil they sell now days once your engine has more then 75,000 miles. FYI many people use the same oil the manufactured called for over 200,000 miles and not have any problems or the need to change from 5w to 10w oil. IMHO many of theses new high mileage oils are away to get more $$$ out of your pocket.
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Old 04-02-2012, 03:58 PM
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I have never gone from 5w to 10w oil just because the engine had 100,000 miles on it, in fact I have never bought into the BS that you need to use the high mileage oil they sell now days once your engine has more then 75,000 miles. FYI many people use the same oil the manufactured called for over 200,000 miles and not have any problems or the need to change from 5w to 10w oil. IMHO many of theses new high mileage oils are away to get more $$$ out of your pocket.
Engine oil is an elusive topic. The oil companies don't help with their "high mileage" oil and "synthetic wannabes" marketing. Conventional oils are fine for normal oil changes. Only way to get rid of the contaminants floating around in the oil is via an oil change. Filters only filter out so much and some filters don't do a very good job of that with efficiencies in the 80% to 90% range. A premium filter should be 95%+ efficient

From Owner Manuals:
- for my 6 cylinder 4.0L in-line Jeep engine, 10W-30 is "preferred" and 5W-30 is to be used below 0F (-18C)
- for a 2004 Caravan, 5W-30 is "preferred" and 10W-30 can be used above 0F (-18C)
- for the Chrysler 4.0L V6 used in the newer vans (2008 to 2010), 10W-30 is the only choice. No alternatives, not even for cold weather.

Perhaps as the engine gets bigger, the tendency is toward heavier oil - makes sense.

I think the oil to beware of is the 5W-20 grade as not being heavy enough, especially for the 3.8L. Here's what SynLube says about 5W-20 oil:
Quote:
You get about 1% better fuel economy, but you get 30% shorter engine life!

The above statement is based on real life experience and is comparison to SAE 5W-30 Motor Oil.
http://www.synlube.com/sae5w-20.htm
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:51 PM
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I have never heard about the increased wear associated to 5W20 oil before. I've always been vigilant on the oil changes but my van has always had the 5W20 (synthetic more recently). I wonder if most owners are running the 5W30 these days...?
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Old 04-02-2012, 08:57 PM
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10w30 is just fine.
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Old 04-05-2012, 02:42 PM
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Based on personal experience with 5w20 oil and how badly the Dodge 3.7 V6 in our Nitro could shear oil, 5w30 oil does not hold up better then 5w20 and from what I've been told by several Dodge mechanics at difference dealerships using 5w30 oil instead of 5w20 allows sludge to build up, sludge reduces oil flow & low oil flow harms the engine. IMHO anytime an engine requires the usage of 5w20 oil its best to use high quality synthetic oil..

Now back to 5w30 V 10w30 subject, I have yet to see Proof that because an engine has 100K or more miles you need to or have to change from 5w to 10w oil.
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Old 04-05-2012, 05:25 PM
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Haven't seen any 0W-10 or 5W-15 motor oil yet so there must be a lower limit to the second number. I think 20 is borderline, maybe too low for some engines, especially the bigger torque engines. The following should know something about motor oil:
1. Amsoil @ http://www.worldsbestoil.ca/which-30-weight-oil.php

Quote:
AMSOIL 0W30 is 57.3 cST @ 40 C, & 11.3 cST @ 100 C

AMSOIL 5W30 is 59.5 cST @ 40 C, & 11.7 cST @ 100 C

AMSOIL 10W30 is 66.1 cST @ 40 C, & 11.7 cST @ 100 C
As you can see from the data above the kinematic viscosities are extremely close. Therefore, whether you use the 0W-30, 5W-30 or the 10W-30 is strictly a matter of choice. With the small differences in kinematic viscosity you would be hard-pressed to detect these differences on initial engine start-up without specialized engine test equipment.

All three oils are excellent motor oils and ANY one can be used in a vehicle which requires either a 0W-30, 5W-30 or 10W-30 oil as well as in several other engine applications including an engine which recommends a 5W- 20 oil.
2. Blackstone Labs @ http://www.blackstone-labs.com/oil-viscosity.php

Quote:
Which Viscosity to Use?
Engine owners often stray from manufacturers' recommendations regarding viscosity of oils. The engine builders dyno-test their engines using a specific viscosity oil, so when you use the viscosity they recommend, you are working with a known result. Going to another viscosity is an experiment, but it's usually a harmless one. For the sake of efficiency you want to run the lightest grade oil in your engine possible, within limits. We are seeing that trend for newer engines, for which the recommended grade is getting progressively lighter. The common 10W/30 has become a 5W/30, and some manufacturers even recommend 5W/20 oil. On the other hand, we can't see (in oil analysis) where it hurts anything to run heavier 10W/30s or even 10W/40s in modern automotive engines. The heavier oils provide more bearing film, and that's important at the lower end. If your oil is too light, the bearing metals can increase. If the oil is too heavy, the upper end metals can increase. The trick is to find the right viscosity for your particular engine, which is why we suggest following the manufacturer's recommendation.
3. Many European cars spec an xW-40 oil, not just cars built in Europe but cars that are imported into Europe.

4. Mobil 1 Extended Life 10W-60 @ http://www.mobil.co.uk/UK-English-LC...fe-10w60.aspx#
Quote:
Mobil 1 Extended Life 10W-60 is engineered to help provide long lasting protection in higher mileage engines so you can get long life out of your vehicle.
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Old 04-05-2012, 07:43 PM
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Arrow Go 0W-20!

I personally wouldn't base my motor oil grade selection on the advise of who knows who?

Instead base it on Used Oil Analysis (UOA). Get your 5W-30 tested, if the wear is within normal tolerance, stay with it. In fact, the 10W-30 could lead to more start-up wear. Don't believe it? How will you know unless you trend against some consecutive UOAs? Answer, you won't know until you do.

Okay, now that I said not to take someone's advice, consider this. After you trend a few UOAs with your 5W-30 and discover it's fine, now try running 0W-20 with subsequent UOAs. Chances are, your wear will remain the same. Don't believe it? How will you know unless you trend against some consecutive UOAs? Answer, you won't know until you do.

Now, with 0W-20 you're getting optimum fuel economy. Not a ton tank-to-tank, but at the end the year take the wife to Red Lobster ;-)
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Old 04-05-2012, 08:29 PM
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Maybe buy the lobster and cook it at home.
Quote:
5W-20 - Should you use it in your vehicle? The answer is simple:
You get about 1% better fuel economy, but you get 30% shorter engine life!

The above statement is based on real life experience and is comparison to SAE 5W-30 Motor Oil.
http://www.synlube.com/sae5w-20.htm
Quote:
The ideal oil viscosity for motor oil used in conventional piston engine operating at the "normal" engine operating temperature is equivalent to SAE 30. (In range of 9 cSt to 12 cSt @ 100 C)

If you use thinner oil (SAE 20) under these "normal" operating conditions there will be LESS resistance to motion due to reduced viscosity, and therefore BETTER Fuel Economy will result.
This gain in fuel economy does not however occur without costs.
- Increase in oil consumption due to lower viscosity. Can be offset by better seals (they cost more)
- Increase in oil consumption due to higher volatility. Can be offset by synthetics (they cost more)
- Decrease in Engine service life due to increased boundary wear under some operating conditions (this will cost more per mile driven or per engine operating hour)

If you use thicker oil (SAE 40 or SAE 50) under these "normal" operating conditions there will be MORE resistance to motion due to increased viscosity, and therefore WORSE Fuel Economy will result. This LOSS in Fuel Economy is somewhat compensated for by:
- Decrease in oil consumption due to higher viscosity.
- Decrease in oil consumption due to lower volatility
- Increase in Engine service life due to reduced boundary wear and better separation of parts in relative motion.
http://www.synlube.com/sae5w-20.htm
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